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Dedicated to Spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the Miskito Indians of Nicaragua

Medical Efforts

Dr. Vargas with a patient.

The focus of our medical endeavors is to provide primary health care for the Tasba Raya area.

 

Much of this involves dealing with acute needs, such as injuries, infections, and childbirth. It also includes helping the villagers receive care for medical problems requiring transportation out of the area for surgery or other treatment.

One health issue that deserves special attention is that of birth control. Most of the women conceive every year from their teens until they are no longer able to have children.We provide contraceptives to help prevent women who are already sickly from having to endure the additional physical strain of pregnancy.

 

Waiting line at a mobile clinic.

 



Mobile Clinics

In addition to operating a clinic in Francia Sirpi, the team takes weekly trips to operate clinics the surrounding villages. There are six villages in the circuit--Santa Clara, La Esperanza, Wisconsin, Tasba Pain, Miguel Bikan, and Ti Kamp. Each week the team visits a different village.

  

Deborah, Mrs. Laura Nyirady, and Rachael teach with a health pos

 

 

Health Education

The ultimate goal of the mission is to be able to rely largely on preventive medicine, to increase health and reduce the need for expensive medications. Health education is the fundamental step toward this goal.

As patients are treated for their ailments, they are taught how their sicknesses could have been prevented. Most are largely ignorant of the most basic health principles, including everything from basic hygiene to nutrition.

 

Dr. Steven Nyirady takes a water sample at a Francia Sirpi well.

 


Safe Water

Clean water is an absolute necessity for good health. When a pump on one the villages' wells stops working, the villagers remove its cap and draw out water with a bucket. Without a cap, the well quickly becomes contaminated. When the villagers see dead frogs floating in the water, they go back to using the dirty creek water again.

The mission is developing an ongoing well assessment and reconditioning program. The twelve lay pastors will double as health leaders, reporting problems with the wells.